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Featured Articles - Canonsburg, PA and McMurray, PA Foot Doctor
Monday, 28 November 2016

Proper Shoe Fitting

Proper shoe fitting is one of the most common concerns people have when it comes to the health of their feet. To some this may not seem like a major issue, but the reality is that improperly fitted shoes account for a tremendous amount of injuries to the foot. Because our feet, our posture, and our gait directly affect the bio-mechanics and the overall structure of our entire body, pains and discomforts felt elsewhere within the body can frequently be attributed to improperly fitted footwear. Here are a few factors to consider, which will help you select the proper footwear when shopping.

Do not purchase shoes with the expectation that they will stretch to accommodate the size of your feet. You are looking for shoes that fit correctly right away. If the shoes you purchase are too large and are slipping in the area of the heel while you walk, do not purchase them. Do not look favorably upon shoes that slip with the intention of wearing thicker socks to compensate for the slippage. Make certain that in the widest portion of the shoes, the ball of your foot, fits comfortably in the shoe.

It may be difficult to focus on these things with all the distractions of shopping, or tempting to ignore them because you badly want an uncomfortable shoe. However, if you cannot wear shoes because they hurt too much to use, your money and time will be wasted. When you get your new shoes home, put them on and walk around on a carpeted surface to see ensure your shoe's fit comfortably with normal activity.

With 33 joints, 26 bones, and over 100 ligaments, the potential for damage to the sensitive components within the foot are greater than many people realize. Finding a properly fitting shoe is the single most important factor you can do to help prevent injury and maintain optimal foot health. Adults tend to forget the fact that our feet continue to change as we grow older. So, even though they may no longer experience growth spurts associated with youth, their feet still change shape as they mature.

If you already have problems with your feet, wearing improperly fitted shoes can potentially exacerbate those problems. Fortunately, it does not require a tremendous amount of effort to find shoes that fit correctly. When shopping for shoes, keep in mind that improperly fitted shoes can not only cause a whole host of disorders and problems to occur within the feet themselves—they can affect the entire bio-mechanical structure of the body. Your posture and your stride are based on your feet, so your footwear can have a tremendous impact on the legs, back, and rest of your body. Finding the proper shoe fitting is essential to keep your feet and body healthly.

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One out of ten broken bones is reported to be in the feet. When an object crushes, bends, or stretches the bone beyond acceptable ranges, bones break. A break in the foot is either a fracture or a straight break.

The location of any break can tell you how the break happened. Toes, for instance, break typically as a result of something being kicked hard and with great force. Heel breaks almost always are a result of an improper landing from a tall height. Twists or sprains are the other two frequent occurrences. As with all usual breaks, they result from unexpected accident or sudden injury. As with stress fractures, breaks form as a process over time from repeated stress on already present cracks. Runners, dancers, and gymnasts are the usual athletes who receive this type of break. Stress fractures result from incredible pressure on the feet. It is no surprise these athletes bear the majority of reported fractures.

Pain, swelling, bruising, and redness are all indicative of the typical symptoms from a broken foot. Severe pain—to the point of not being able to walk—usually depends on the location of the break in the foot. Toes are on the lower scale of pain threshold, but heels are high, as are a few other particular bones. As the severity of the broken foot increases, symptoms like blueness, numbness, misshaping of the foot, cuts, or deformities will become apparent. These symptoms indicate the need to see a medical professional with access to an x-ray facility.

Prior to seeing a specialist, precautions should be taken to reduce pain and swelling. Elevate and stabilize the foot, and refrain from moving it. Immobilization of the foot is the next priority, so creating a homemade splint is acceptable. Keep in mind that while creating a splint, any increase of pain or cutting off blood circulation means that the splint should be removed immediately. Use ice to decrease swelling and relieve pain symptoms.

When dealing with a medical center, the patient should note that the treatment can vary. The treatment will depend on the severity of the fracture and the cause of the break. Crutches, splits, or casts are common treatments while surgery has been known to be used in more severe cases in order to repair the break in the bones.

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Foot and ankle injuries are common among people who participate in sports. Several factors contribute to this. They include failing to stretch or warm up properly, not wearing the proper type of shoe and not taping or providing other types of support for the ankle or foot. The most common foot and ankle injuries suffered by people involved in sports are plantar fasciitis, ankle sprains and Achilles tendon damage or ruptures. If not treated properly, they can lead to permanent disability.

Treating these injuries is relatively simple if they are identified and addressed early. Many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains associated with injury as just soreness or tired muscles. Their first response is usually to try to work through it. This can lead to serious problems. Many minor injuries are made far more serious when athletes continue to put strain and pressure on them. That attitude can change a mild strain into a serious strain and a minor tear into a rupture. Athletes should have unusual aches and pains evaluated by a skilled medical professional.

Plantar fasciitis is a painful injury. It is inflammation of the plantar fascia, the thick band of tissue running from the heel to the base of the toes. If left untreated, it can lead to a degenerative disease called plantar fasciosis. There are several effective treatments for this ailment. Doctors often prescribe rest, massages, stretching, night splints, physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, corticosteroids or surgery, usually in that order. The most effective treatment for plantar fasciitis is orthotics, which offers foot support. Surgery is occasionally used as a last resort, but it comes with the risk of nerve damage and infection and often does not stop the pain.

The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body. It connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. Running, jumping and walking all impact this tendon. Two common injuries to the Achilles tendon are tendonitis and a rupture of the tendon. Tendonitis is inflammation in the tendon often caused by an increase in the amount of stress placed on it. Non-surgical treatments include rest, ice or anti-inflammatory medication. A rupture (tear) of the Achilles tendon can be treated by placing the lower leg in a cast for several weeks or with surgery. Many physicians feel surgery is the better option because it lowers the risk of re-ruptures. Both methods require 4 to 6 months of rehabilitation.

Ankle sprains are the most common sports related foot and ankle injury. A sprain occurs when the ligament holding the ankle bones and joint stretches beyond its normal range. It can be treated non-surgically with a combination of rest, ice wrapped around the joint for 30 minutes immediately after injury, compression by a bandage and elevating the ankle above the heart for 48 hours. This combination is referred to as RICE. Severe ankle sprains in which the ligaments are torn may require reconstructive surgery followed by rehabilitation.

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